A Grid Perspective; why Solar Trackers?

Dual Axis Tracking vs. Stationary

Despite the continued downward solar PV module price pressure, Solar trackers will remain an important component in tomorrow’s energy systems because of the sustained daily power curve.

With stationary solar PV systems, a daily bell shaped power curve is produced with maximum power produced at noon. As a result, a the power grid will have to be engineered to distribute the momentary noon time power production. A poor cost/benefit proposition.

Solar tracking systems will, because of the sustained power curve, provide the grid with a sustained power curve throughout the day. As a result, possibly little to no additional engineering efforts will have to be made to the grid.

It is the cost/benefit proposition from the grid’s perspective which will drive the need for future tracking systems, and this is something we will see in the way Power Purchase Agreements are about to be negotiated.

Global Warming; Greenland 2012

small

South East Greenland, July 2012

Anyone traveling from Europe and to the US will inevitably cross Greenland. If you are lucky, the weather will be clear, and you can because of the low humidity see for 100’s of miles. Such was the case when I first flew from Copenhagen to JFK/New York in August 1979. Approaching Greenland, an entirely white landscape unfolded dotted with floating icebergs.

On a recent return trip in July 2012, my path was roughly the same. To my astonishment I saw barely any icebergs, and large swaths of coastline with nothing but exposed bedrock. Continuing inland, there were long stretchmarks in the ice. A week after my arrival, we could in the news read about massive ice melts and flooding in Greenland.